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17 May 2022

New safefood research reveals protein bars not as healthy as people think

New safefood research reveals protein bars not as healthy as people think

New safefood research reveals protein bars not as healthy as people think

A new research report launched today by safefood has revealed that chocolate is the main ingredient in almost 40% of protein bars surveyed, with many also being high in saturated fat and containing added sugar and salt. 

The research also found that over one in three people (37%) surveyed think protein bars are “healthy”. 

When comparing current protein intakes among adults with what’s recommended, both men and women are already consuming more protein than they need from their diet.

The safefood research looked at the nutritional content of 83 high-protein snack foods and drinks available for sale in supermarkets on the island of Ireland. These foods include protein bars, yoghurts, yoghurt-style products and milk drinks. According to industry sources, there was a 498% increase in products launched between 2010 and 2016 with a high-protein claim.

Introducing the research, Dr Catherine Conlon, director of human health and nutrition at safefood, said: “We’ve witnessed a significant and consistent upsurge in the number and variety of foods and drinks for sale which claim to be ‘high-protein’. From bars to milks and yoghurts, high-protein foods have now become mainstream in our supermarkets. When we asked people about protein bars, a third of them thought they were healthy. However, many of these bars are, in reality, highly processed foods with a calorie content similar to that of a bar of chocolate.

“What’s also evident from dietary data is that men and women are already consuming more than enough protein in their diets and simply don’t need this extra, highly processed protein,” stated Dr Conlon. 

Of the 39 protein bars surveyed, 38% listed chocolate as their main ingredient. 77% were high in saturated fat, with 79% being a source of salt. The average bar size was 55g with an average price of €2.27, though some bars cost as much as €3 each.

“Processed snack foods high in protein need to be combined with fat, sugar or salt in order to make them tasty,” continued Dr Conlon. “People would be better sticking to natural sources of protein in their diet, which tend to be much healthier. And if you need a source of protein as a snack, alternatives like some nuts, a small glass of milk or yoghurt is the way to go instead of these foods with added chocolate.”

The A survey of high-protein snack foods report is available to download at www.safefood.eu.

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