10 things your 'poor mammy' said to wreck your head growing up

Justin Kelly

Reporter:

Justin Kelly

Email:

news@waterfordlive.ie

10 things your 'poor mammy' said to wreck your head growing up

10 things your 'poor mammy' said to wreck your head growing up

It's not a hotel you're in...

You're lying up not doing a tap and your mother is having none of it. If you left a used cup at the sink, you had to prepare for variances of this as well as a short sarcastic lecture on how the dishwasher works.

The washing machine is empty there...

As she put her feet up (for once!) she subtly reminded you that you needed to do a few loads of washing because your room was like 'a bomb hit it' and she's not doing it anymore, 'no way, not a chance, not a hope, I'm sick of it...

I never get a minute...

If you moaned about the washing machine, you got this old chestnut as your mother sat down for the first time in about 40 years. She proceeded to take over then because 'there was absolutely nothing on the telly' and you were doing it wrong anyway.

We'll see...

If you asked for that new pair of shoes or for a lift somewhere, you got this stopgap response. This allowed your mother pawn you off until you forgot what you asked for. 'We'll see' never actually meant 'We'll see!'

What would you do without me...

You'd hear this if your mother did something for you (something you never asked her to in the first place!) around the house.

Get up for mass...

The dreaded chorus droning through the bedroom door of a Sunday morning. If you ignored it, you were eventually beaten out of the bed with the wooden spoon. If you point-blank refused, you got that look of mammy disappointment for around six years!

The grass is very long out there...

Loosely translated, 'Get up off your arse you lazy brat and mow the feckin' grass - what will the neighbours think?' She often followed you out to supervise!

Your sister/brother would never say that to me...

Playing the siblings off one another; an age-old tactic of the Irish mammy. This was produced if you so much as shaped up to give a bit of backchat. 

Wait till your father hears about this...

This was supposed to be a threat but your mother either forgot about the cheek you had given by evening or your aul lad was less than bothered about having an argument with a hormonal teenager.

C'mere till I fix ya....

You got the old licked thumb across the cheeks and a hairbrush lashed over the top of your head. These words struck fear into the children of Ireland, not least if you were out in front of friends.